Monday, 17 September 2018 00:00

Severe pain and discomfort that is felt on the ball of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It is often the result of nerves that become inflamed between the third and fourth toes, and is often known as a intermetatarsal neuroma. A major symptom of this condition is pain that is experienced on the bottom of the foot, possibly causing difficulty in walking.  Many people may generally feel a tingling sensation in addition to feeling a burning sensitivity in the ball of the foot. A common reason for this condition to occur may be choosing to wear shoes that do not fit properly, and this may possibly cause the nerves in the foot to become irritated and inflamed. Additionally, performing certain activities may play a significant role in the formation of Morton’s neuroma. It’s advised to counsel with a podiatrist for proper treatments if you are afflicted with this ailment

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Rouder of S.I. Podiatry. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Staten Island, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Thursday, 13 September 2018 00:00

Your feet are covered a good part of the day. If you are diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often another sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 10 September 2018 00:00

The cuboid bone is one of seven bones that is located on the outside of the foot. The main function of this bone is to function as the connecting link between the foot and the ankle. Additionally, it provides the necessary stability the body needs while walking and running. The condition referred to as cuboid syndrome occurs when the tendons and ligaments tear and this may typically happen as a result of an injury. There are several symptoms that may be associated with this ailment, including pain and discomfort on the outside of the foot next to the pinky toe, swelling in the ankle area, or redness near the injury and surrounding areas. The most common reasons for this condition to occur may be twisting the ankle during a fall, and repeated strain due to overuse, which often occurs during sporting activities. There may be several ways to treat cuboid syndrome, and it’s suggested to speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible to learn what the best treatment technique is right for you.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Rouder from S.I. Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Staten Island, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
Tuesday, 04 September 2018 00:00

It’s important for most people to check their feet frequently for abnormal conditions, and this is especially true for diabetic patients. If cuts, scrapes and blisters are not noticed, the chances of developing an infection may be amplified because of the body’s inability to heal efficiently. If there are wounds on the feet, recent research has shown the importance of resting frequently, which takes pressure off of the affected area. If you notice cuts on your feet and ankles, it’s suggested to consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible. At this time a treatment plan can be discussed, which may include what type of wound dressing to use and how often it should be changed. It may be helpful to the patient and may aid in the healing process if the blood sugar levels can be controlled by maintaining a healthy diet and gentle exercise plan.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Rouder from S.I. Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a nondiabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Staten Island, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Connect With Us